AusRFS (NSW) Show Standards for Mice

Version 4.0 (January 2015)

Eyes

The eyes are to be large, bold, and prominent, showing great animation and interest.

Ears

The ears large and tulip shaped, thin, almost transparent, and free from creases. They should be carried erect and facing forward with plenty of width between them. They should be placed at approximately 10 and 2 on a clock face.

Head

The head must be long and clean in its lines, not too fine or pointed at the muzzle. The skull should show breadth as well as length, and have good width between the eyes as well as the ears, and good distance from the ears to the eyes. The muzzle should show a curved roman nose outline when viewed from the side. When viewed from the top, the whisker bed should maintain the line of the head and not be pinched at the cheeks.

Tail

The tail should be free from kinks, and should come well out of the back and be thick at the root or set-on, gradually tapering like a whip lash to a fine end, the length being about equal to that of the mouse’s body. The junction with the backbone should form the apex of a well-defined triangle, based on the hips.

Conformation

The general appearance should be one of sleekness and alert attention and be pleasing to the eye. The body should be long and slim, arched over the loin and racy in appearance. A large, heavy mouse with athletic musculature is desirable.

Condition

The mouse should be exhibited in its natural, unaltered state. It should be in excellent health, feeling strong and vigorous in hand. Breathing should be clear, quiet and not too fast. Coat should be clean and free from excess oils, dust, dirt and staining. Nails should be clean and clipped if necessary. Tail should be clean with no bumps or scarring. Eyes should not squint, and should be bright and clear, eyelashes not curled into the eye, with no irritation or porphyrin present. Ears should be clean and uninjured. The mouse should be neither over- or underweight to the detriment of its health.

Faults:

  • Dirty, oily or stained coat
  • Too fat or too thin
  • Nails too long
  • Missing whiskers
  • Minor signs of sickness or injury, eg. sneezing, small scabs, nicked ear

Disqualifications:

  • Pregnant or nursing females
  • Respiratory problems, excessive scabs, mites or lice, abscesses, wounds or eye infections
  • Obvious ill health and tumours
  • Animals under 6 weeks of age
  • Missing body parts
  • Surgical alteration
  • Any dyeing, plucking or trimming intended to alter natural condition
  • Any obvious physical abnormality

Temperament

The mouse should be calm and easy to handle, not showing signs of stress or anxiety in the show tank or during handling. It should be inquisitive and confident, and not shy away from being picked up, squeak or kick. It should sit calmly during handling and not appear too eager to escape. The body should be held softly and not be rigid with fear, standing confidently on the hand, and not tip-toeing to avoid contact. Breathing and movement should be normal showing no signs of distress.

Faults:

  • Hyperactive to the point of making the animal difficult to judge
  • Displaying signs of stress or fear at being benched or handled

Disqualifications:

  • Biting or intractability

Coat

Standard

The coat is to be smooth and glossy, and feel fine to the hand. It should show a natural high shine and densely cover the body, including the belly, groin, area around the front legs, and behind the ears.

Faults:

  • Coat too long or with long guard hairs
  • Thin, sparse or uneven coat

Long Coat

The coat is to be as long as possible, without sacrificing denseness, with both long guard and undercoat hairs. The hair is to be finer and silkier in texture than Standard mice.

Faults:

  • Guard hairs or undercoat too short
  • Thin, sparse or uneven coat

Rex

The coat is to be no longer than a Standard coat and have dense, crimped or curled hair over the entire body. The guard hairs are to be slightly longer than the rest of the coat and somewhat rough in texture. The whiskers should be curly.

Faults:

  • Poor curl, or inconsistent curl over the body
  • Coat too long or with long guard hairs
  • Whiskers broken or brittle
  • Thin, sparse or uneven coat

Long Coat Rex

The coat is to be as long and curly as possible, with both guard and undercoat hairs crimped or curly. The hair is to be fine and slightly silky in texture. The whiskers should be curly.

Faults:

  • Poor curl, or inconsistent curl over the body
  • Guard hairs or undercoat too short
  • Whiskers broken or brittle
  • Thin, sparse or uneven coat

Manx

Manx mice can be exhibited in any recognised coat type. The identifying feature is the complete absence of a tail. This is a condition of birth, and not an amputation. The body should be pear shaped with slight rise to rump carriage.

Faults:

  • As for applicable coat type
  • Very small tail stub
  • Dimpling indicating the spine is too short

Disqualifications:

  • Obvious tail stub
  • Any physical deformity due to being tailless

Hairless

Hairless mice can be exhibited in any colour or marking (no points are awarded for colour or marking). They should have a thin, bright, and slightly translucent skin, free of scars or pimples, and be as hairless as possible. Wrinkling should not be penalised. The eyes should be bright and free from any problems. The ears should be very large and wrinkle free. The toenails should be short (clipped if necessary). Whiskers and eyelashes may be curled and shorter than usual, but cannot be brittle, very short or missing. Eyelashes should not be so curled as to be poking into the eyes.

Faults:

  • Excessive fuzz or hairs on the body
  • Whiskers broken or brittle
  • Skin lacking healthy glow, looking dull, flaky or unusually greasy
  • Skin unusually thick and rough and not soft
  • Minor scars or blemishes on the skin

Disqualifications:

  • Excessive fur over the body
  • Major skin blemishes indicating a health problem
  • Any evidence of entropian (eyelids curling into the eyes causing swelling and irritation)

Colour & Marking

Self

General

The coat is to be evenly coloured, without mottling, fading or white ticking. Foot and belly colour is to match the top. A paler throat and belly is permissible on light colours.

Faults:

  • Faded, uneven or rusted colour
  • Excessively light underparts
  • White flecking or silvered/white hairs throughout the coat
  • Tan hairs behind ears or around vent
  • White feet or toes
  • Small tail marking, to less than a quarter of the tail length

Disqualifications:

  • White spotting
  • Large tail marking, more than a quarter of the tail length

Black (a/a)

A pure, lustrous black with no flecking or rusting. Eyes black.

Dove (a/a p/p)

A warm, soft grey, distinguished from silver by its warmth. Eyes pink.

Chocolate (a/a b/b)

A deep, rich, chocolate brown, resembling milk chocolate. Eyes black.

Champagne (a/a b/b p/p)

A clean warm beige with a pink tint. Eyes pink.

Blue (a/a d/d)

A medium, slate blue, resembling the blue colour found in cats. Eyes black.

Silver (a/a d/d p/p)

A pale, ice blue, with no hint of browning. Eyes pink.

Lilac (a/a b/b d/d)

A dark metallic silver, neither too blue nor too brown. Eyes black.

Lavender (a/a b/b d/d p/p)

A pale, pastel grey with a subtle pinkish hue. Eyes pink.

Fawn (A^y/*)

A warm shade of deep orange, distinguished from ginger by its richness. Eyes black.

Ginger (A^y/* p/p)

A vivid, bright orange. Eyes pink.

Straw (A^y/* d/d)

A medium, soft yellow, to resemble the colour of oaten hay. Eyes black.

Cream (A^y/* c^ch/c^ch)

A creamy, pastel yellow, without greyness or sootiness. Eyes black.

Havana (a/a c^ch/c^ch)

A rich, deep dark brown which resembles un-milked coffee. Eyes black.

Coffee (a/a c^ch/c)

A medium brown with a grey tint, similar to milked coffee. Eyes black.

Bone (a/a c^e/c)

A very pale cream, to resemble off-white and to have no yellow tinge. Eyes black.

White

A snow white, with no hint of flecking, ticking or lemon spotting. Eyes pink or black.

Ticked

General

The coat is to give the impression of being evenly coloured, with no darkening along the spine, mottling, fading or white ticking. The demarcation between top colour and belly colour is to be even and smooth, with no sign of brindling. Ticking shall extend over the entire body, including he feet. Foot colour is to match the top.

Faults:

  • Faded, uneven or rusted colour
  • White flecking or silvered/white hairs throughout the coat
  • Inconsistent ticking, as to almost appear merle
  • Darkening along the spine
  • White feet or toes
  • Small tail marking, to less than a quarter of the tail length

Disqualifications:

  • White spotting
  • Large tail marking, more than a quarter of the tail length

Agouti (A/*)

The coat is to have an overall rich, chestnut brown colour, with dark slate undercoat. There will be black ticking throughout the coat, with black guard hairs, extending over the entire body, including the feet, with the belly being silver-grey. Eyes black.

Argente (A/* p/p)

The coat is to be a warm, rich orange, with dove grey undercoat. There will be grey ticking throughout the coat, with grey guard hairs, and the belly being silvery. Eyes pink.

Cinnamon (A/* b/b)

As for Agouti, with gold tan substituting for the rich brown and ticking and undercoat to be of a chocolate brown colour, with the belly colour being a warm mid grey. Eyes black.

Apricot (A/* b/b p/p)

As for Argente, but with a bright creamy undercoat colour, giving a brighter, fresher appearance. The belly colour is a creamy silver. Eyes pink.

Blue Agouti (A/* d/d)

The coat is to have an overall soft straw colour, with steel blue undercoat and blue ticking throughout. The belly is a cool silver. Eyes black.

Chinchilla (A/* c^ch/c or A/* c^ch/c^e)

The coat should have a pale, pearl-grey base colour, with grey tips as dark as possible. The colours should be evenly ticked to give a salt-and-pepper appearance. Eyes black.

Silver Agouti (A/* c^ch/c^ch)

As for Agouti, but where golden brown would be expected substitute silver grey. The ticking is still to be as black as possible, with the belly colour to range from silver grey to dark slate grey. Eyes black.

Argente Cream (A/* c^ch/c^ch p/p)

The coat is to be a delicate blend of a pale, creamy orange and silver, with the undercoat an
extremely pale silvery white. Eyes pink.

Shaded

General

The coat is to be evenly coloured, without mottling or unsightly moult patterns. Foot and belly colour is to match the top. A paler throat and belly is permissible on light colours.

Faults:

  • Body colour too dark as to lose contrast with points
  • Points too light, or lacking points on the ears, tail or feet
  • Nose point extending above the eyes
  • Mottled or uneven colouring of the body
  • White feet or toes
  • Small tail marking, to less than a quarter of the tail length

Disqualifications:

  • White spotting
  • Large tail marking, more than a quarter of the tail length

Siamese (a/a c^h/c^h)

The coat is to be warm beige over the entire body, shading to a deeper colour on the hindquarters. The colours should blend gradually. Points should be a rich chocolate colour, or as dark as possible, and they should be well defined on the muzzle, and well confined to the whisker, muzzle, rump, tail, ears and feet areas. Eyes ruby.

Blue Siamese (a/a c^h/c^h d/d)

Placement of points and shading as in Siamese. Background colour is a paler shade with a blue hue. Points are to be a deep slate blue, paler than those of Siamese mice, but contrast of points and shading on background must still be clear and well defined. Eyes ruby.

Himalayan (a/a c^h/c)

The coat is to be as white as possible in colour over the entire body, with well defined points. Points are to be a rich, milk chocolate, and should conform to the Siamese standard in regards to size and placement. Eyes pink or ruby.

Burmese (a/a c^ch/c^h)

The coat is to be a dark, rich chocolate. The points are to be as dark as possible, almost black.
Points should conform to the Siamese standard in regards to size and placement, with no shading. Eyes black.

Blue Burmese (a/a c^ch/c^h d/d)

Placement of points as in Burmese. Background colour is a medium powder blue. Points are to be a deep slate blue, paler than those of Burmese mice, but contrast of points on background must still be clear and well defined. Eyes black.

Colourpoint Beige (a/a c^e/c^h)

The coat is to be a soft, light brown, similar to milked coffee, with points as dark as possible. Points should conform to the Siamese standard in regards to size and placement, with no shading. Eyes black.

Colourpoint Smoke (a/a c^e/c^h d/d)

Placement of points as in Colourpoint Beige. Background colour is light grey with a blue hue. Points are to be a medium powder blue, paler than those of Colourpoint Beige mice, but contrast of points on background must still be clear and well defined. Eyes black.

Reverse Siamese (a/a c^e/c^e)

The coat is to be a medium brown with a grey tint, similar to milked coffee. The points are to be a bright white, and conform to the Siamese standard in regards to size and placement. Eyes black.

Sable (A^y/* U/*)

Sable mice are to be as dark as possible on the back, extending from the tip of the nose to the base of the tail, with the belly colour contrasting strongly. The shading is to be gradual, extending down the sides of the animal with no lines of demarcation. A pale nose and tail base is to be penalised.

Sable mice can be shown in any recognised colour, so long as the shading is clearly defined against the base colour.

Fox and Tan

General

Fox and Tan mice can be exhibited in any recognised colour that is dark enough for the belly marking to be clearly visible. The coat is to be evenly coloured, without mottling, fading or white ticking. There should be a distinct demarcation between the top and belly colours, running in straight lines along the sides, jaw and legs. The feet shall be the belly colour on the inside, and the top colour on the outside. Eye colour should match the coat colour.

Faults:

  • Faded, uneven or rusted top colour
  • White flecking or silvered/white hairs throughout the coat
  • Line between belly and top colour indistinct
  • Brindling or intermingling of belly and top colour
  • White feet or toes
  • Small tail marking, to less than a quarter of the tail length

Disqualifications:

  • White spotting
  • Large tail marking, more than a quarter of the tail length

Tan

The belly colour should be as rich a tan as possible, leaning towards orange. Tan hairs are permitted behind the ears.

Faults:

  • Faded belly colour, or other colour hair in the tan

Fox

The belly colour should be white, with no tan edges. White hairs are permitted behind the ears.

Faults

  • Belly showing any colour other than white, or any other colour hair in the white

Marked

General

Marked mice can be exhibited in any recognised self or ticked colour. They may not be exhibited in shaded or fox/tan varieties. Eye colour should match the coat colour.

Banded

Banded mice should be a solid colour over the body, except for a band of white around the waist, as if they are wearing a belt. The band should be positioned at the 3rd quarter of the body length from the head, excluding the tail. The band should be no more than a quarter of the length of the body, and all markings should be clean and even. All feet should be white.

Faults:

  • Uneven or ragged markings
  • White spotting in the coloured area or coloured spotting in the white area
  • White feet, toes or tail

Disqualifications:

  • Incomplete band

Brindle

Brindle mice are to have tiger striping that extends from the nose to the tip of the tail, including the feet and ears, and to a lesser extent, the belly. A “W” or “M” marking on the forehead is desirable. The stripes should be as dark as possible, contrasting with the base colour strongly. Brindle mice can be shown in any recognised colour, so long as the stripes are clearly defined.

Faults:

  • Colours not balanced (too much of one colour)
  • Absence of striping on belly, ears, feet or tail
  • Lack of contrast between stripes and base colour

Disqualifications

  • Any white spotting

Dutch

Dutch mice will have markings like those of a Dutch rabbit. The front half of the body is to be white, with the exception of the cheek patches. Cheek patches are located on either side of the head, and are to include the ears, upper jowls, and the area immediately forward of the eyes. The cheek markings should be well rounded and balanced, and clear of the whiskers.
A wedge shaped blaze of white should run from muzzle to neck, running between the coloured ears. The saddle on the rear half of the body should be of solid colour and the dividing line between colour and white should be as straight and as cleanly cut as possible, extending to the top and bottom of the mouse. The colour should extend well into the tail, and the remaining area should be flesh coloured. The white stops on the hind feet should be uniform in length, and their dividing line should be about halfway between the toes and the hocks.

Faults:

  • Uneven or ragged markings
  • White spotting in the coloured area or coloured spotting in the white area
  • Saddle too far back
  • Back legs white

Hereford

The face shall be white, extending to a V shape which terminates just beyond the line of the ears, the white going under the chin and clean cut, but not extending down the throat. The ears and tail shall be of the standardised colour with the latter half of the tail being white. The belly shall have a rectangle-shaped white marking, starting between the front legs and ending at the vent with the white not to extend up the sides of the body or down the legs. The feet shall be white.

Faults:

  • Uneven or ragged markings
  • White spotting in the coloured area or coloured spotting in the white area

Broken Marked

Broken Marked mice shall have as many coloured spots or patches as possible on a white background, even in size, sharply defined, and distributed irregularly over the body. A blaze or headspot is desirable.

Faults:

  • Uneven or ragged markings
  • Colours not balanced (too much of one colour)

Even Marked

Even Marked mice shall have markings that are symmetrical down the centre line of the body. A blaze or headspot is desirable.

Faults:

  • Uneven or ragged markings
  • Colours not balanced (too much of one colour)

Variegated

Variegated mice shall appear white with splashes of colour over the entire body, including the
underside. The splashes are generally small and numerous, though actual size and number can
vary. Most importantly, they should approximately be the same size and be evenly distributed.

Faults:

  • Defined spots (not ragged)
  • Too few splashes